Musings on Evil

Scott Putesky, former guitarist of Marilyn Manson and the Spooky Kids, said something about Manson in an interview once that really stood out to me: basically, that he considered it odd that Manson would embrace the villany attributed to him only to get so butthurt about how people blamed him for Columbine. Scott didn’t understand why, after making a career of saying to the world “I’ll be your scapegoat”, Marilyn Manson wouldn’t embrace the notorioty that accompanied the blame for that school shooting.

Personally, I’m a bit more forgiving of Manson’s stance and his consequent action, and I thought Holy Wood was a more than adequate response to being scapegoated. But in how this applies to me, and maybe to Sith in a more general sense… why did we always argue that we weren’t evil? To feel accepted, to make the other Force realists more comfortable with us? To feel more comfortable with ourselves?

Think about what I – and (in my opinion) others – believe in, encourage, and actively promote: empowerment, mindful exercise and expansion of one’s influence, victory, etc. Causing other people pain, taking something that could’ve been theirs, usually isn’t a goal, or even encouraged, but I won’t say not to. Shit happens anyways and, to be perfectly honest, I’d rather it happened for something more meaningful than a vague, impersonal greater good or altruistic idiocy.

*shrugs* I’d thought I’d grown for having evolved passed the idea that I was evil, way, way back. But here I am starting to understand that I’ve been evil for a very long time. A potentially corrupting influence to anyone that dares to listen to or buy into anything I say or do – which is something I’m privately a bit proud of, by the way.

The defining point of many an “evil” character is that he (or she) doesn’t even believe in evil… or good. Only influence, ambition, victory, freedom. In being beyond good and evil, I naturally become a being that, through the eyes of someone that believes in good and evil, is Evil. Being beyond good and evil means that to someone still confined by moralities teaching of Good & Evil, I am indeed evil. Now if you’re going to say, “well, you haven’t killed anybody, you don’t beat women, you don’t deal in slaves… even if you are evil, surely you can’t be the worst,” then that’s true, in that I do none of those things. I mean hell, as a general rule of thumb I don’t even steal or anything.

All the same, part of the reason the Devil is so scary – at least as he’s often been portrayed in fiction – is that he’s convinced scores of people he doesn’t even exist. And the ones that do… he can charm, bedazzle, and be absolutely honest, all the while corrupting them. Subversive, subtle, honest, likeable, and – by the dogmatic standards of, oh, let’s say a Christian extremist (for example) – Evil.

Really, what it seems to come down to is that I’m evil whether I acknowledge the validity of the paradigm that uses such a word or not, and since it applies to me in some sense… I might as well embrace it with a smirk on my face and a sinister urge to spread the darkness around a little. There was a time when people would bicker back and forth about whether Sith (and others with darker leanings) were evil. And there was a time I loathed such an accusation. But for me it seems that time has passed. I don’t believe in evil, but to those that do… even if they treat me simply as a fellow pathwalker, even if they tell themselves I’m not evil, chances are I’m the worst breed of it.

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5 comments

  1. It reminds me of something I wrote recently – that what makes Sith stand apart from the other, “Lighter” paths is their ability to be the “bad guys”; to make the tough decisions, to take the helm when no one else, to shoulder responsibilities that others wash their hands of – a willingness to get our hands dirty, so to speak.

    It reminds me of a woman recently complaining that I was “stealing” her husband. It was annoying at the time but in hindsight it’s a little funny. There was no intention of “theft” – just that he seemed to like spending time with me, and I enjoyed the attention. Apparently he wasn’t happy at home – but does that part get looked at? Of course not. Convenient scapegoat – right here. And the great part about being Sith is that you get choose your “brand” of evil – to shoulder the blame and let them think of you as the bad guy, or to be really cruel and point out their shortcomings. Regardless, I enjoyed spending time with the man and continue to do so, despite the assertion that I am somehow wrong for doing so. My mother, too, blames me for destroying our family. There is not much to be done about that. I made choices that eventually did lead to destruction, but I took the helm at a time when no one else would and that is what I get saddled with in response.

    Likewise – because I am a woman and I am comfortable in my sexuality, I am envied by other women to the point of hatred. Obviously I am a slut, or some other derogatory word – again, my own mother has called me a slut for being confident and certain enough to dare to divorce my ex-husband – something she envies in me and therefore hates me for possessing.

    “Evil” is just a word another people use to try and tear you down. You’re supposed to care if you’re evil. It’s just like selfish, ruthless, cold, etc. You’re supposed to care. You’re supposed to not want to be these things.

    But I don’t think any of us particularly want to be “cold”. I sure don’t wake up every day thinking, “Gee, how can I best be really selfish today?” It’s just that when looking out for other people means we’re getting overlooked, we stop looking out for them. We know where to draw our lines. We have boundaries. And we’re not supposed to. We’re supposed to be good, kind people who let others use as doormats and toilet paper, because that’s what it means to be on a spiritual path.

    They called the serpent “evil” because it offered Eve the knowledge of the difference between right and wrong. If I offer people the knowledge that they have created their own sad little lives, and if they have lost their husband or their family, it is because of their own sad faults, am I evil? Maybe yes, but it’s not as though they have to hear it, and it’s not as though I mind that definition, all that much. After all, I am Woman, and I am Original Sin; Original Lust, Original Wrath, Original Pride… Yep, if that’s evil, then I can stand to be evil.

  2. One of the first great compromises and watering down of darkness. The idea that it needs to be universaly understood, accepted, and conviently ambiguous for the masses.

    “No, were not evil, dark,etc. Were just like you,# just misunderstood, were really after the same thing.”

    Fucking sick.

    1. I think it depends on your beliefs. Going by what I’d consider purer Light practices and teachings (including, but not limited to, Jedi Realists), my behavior, outlooks, and the things I encourage even here should by all rights be regarded as evil. That I’m not, in my opinion, depends on a person having a very accomadating, arguably watered down outlook of good and evil, or else doesn’t believe in the validity of that (conventional good/evil) paradigm.

      And don’t get me wrong, I’m of the opinion that a sensible person would be hard pressed to call me Evil without people rolling their eyes 🙂 . But then, I don’t tend to think of Lighter paths as possessing very sensible outlooks or beliefs.

      To try to get across what I mean, take Jedi Realism as an example… I refered to Opie – a long-time member of the online Jedi Communities and one of my favorite Jedi – by the name of his path (Jedi) in a very double-edged way. “You’re presuming to tell me how to run my program, and how to run this aspect? Stick to what you know Jedi.” Opie took that as a compliment of sorts… and it was, just as much as it was an insult. I respect the guy for his commitment to the Jedi Way, but at the same time I detest the core values of that path, I think it’s detrimental not only to the individual that puts those beliefs into practice, but also to those around him or her.

      You might not agree, but maybe that gives a bit of insight into where I’m coming from 🙂

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